Bonanza Creek LTER

Wildfire in Alaskan black spruce forests. Photo by Laona DeWilde

Key Research Findings:

Understanding gained through long-term research at BNZ suggests that traditional knowledge and ways of life will be important means by which Alaskan indigenous communities will adapt to changes in climate and fire regimes.
BNZ scientists have discovered that the thaw of permafrost induced by climate change is causing the rapid decomposition of previously frozen organic carbon in boreal forest soils. This CO2 release is likely to amplify climate warming to the same extent as land use change worldwide.
By tracking seasonal changes in snow cover for decades, BNZ scientists have discovered that the snow free season in the boreal forests of Alaska is lengthening and likely to speed the rate of warming by increasing the amount of light energy absorbed by the land surface.

Overview: The Bonanza Creek Long Term Ecological Research program is located in the boreal forest of interior Alaska, USA. Our facilities are centered in the city of Fairbanks. Research at our LTER site focuses on improving our understanding of the long-term consequences of changing climate and disturbance regimes in the Alaskan boreal forest. Our overall objective is to document the major controls over forest dynamics, biogeochemistry, and disturbance and their interactions in the face of a changing climate. The site was established in Fairbanks, Alaska in 1987 as part of the National Science Foundation's Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) Program
Read more.

History: The Bonanza Creek LTER is currently in its third funding cycle. LTER 1, LTER 2 and LTER 3 are successive proposals to date. Bonanza Creek operates under LTER 3 but much of the research design for core datasets originates from LTER 1 and LTER 2.
Read more.

Research Topics: Successional processes associated with wildfire and floodplains; facilitative and competitive interactions among plant species throughout succession; plant-mediated changes in resource and energy availability for decomposers; herbivorous control of plant species composition; hydrologic regime and stream ecology.
Read more.

Feedback

Theme by Danetsoft and Danang Probo Sayekti inspired by Maksimer