LTER Book Series

Alaska's Changing Arctic: Ecological Consequences for Tundra, Streams, and Lakes by John E. Hobbie (Editor), George W. Kling (Editor)
Hardcover, $80.96

In this edition of the Long Term Ecological Research Network series, editors John Hobbie and George Kling and 58 co-authors synthesize the findings from the NSF-funded Arctic LTER project based at Toolik Lake, Alaska, a site that has been active since the mid-1970s. The book presents research on the core issues of climate-change science in the treeless arctic region of Alaska. As a whole, it examines both terrestrial and freshwater-aquatic ecosystems, and their three typical habitats: tundra, streams, and lakes.
The book provides a history of the Toolik Lake LTER site, and discusses its present condition and future outlook. It features contributions from top scientists from many fields, creating a multidisciplinary survey of the Alaskan arctic ecosystem. Chapter topics include glacial... Read more

Long-Term Response of a Forest Watershed Ecosystem: Clearcutting in the Southern Appalachians by Wayne T. Swank (Author), Jackson R. Webster (Author)
Hardcover, $44.96

Our North American forests are no longer the wild areas of past centuries; they are an economic and ecological resource undergoing changes from both natural and management disturbances. A watershed-scale and long-term perspective of forest ecosystem responses is requisite to understanding and predicting cause and effect relationships. This book synthesizes interdisciplinary studies conducted over thirty years, to evaluate responses of a clear-cut, cable-logged watershed at the Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory in the Nantahala Mountain Range of western North Carolina. This research was the result of collaboration among Forest Service and university researchers on the most studied watershed in the Lab's 78-year history. During the experiment, a variety of natural disturbances occurred:... Read more

Land of Extremes by Alexander Huryn, John Hobbie
Paperback, $29.95

This book is a comprehensive guide to the natural history of the North Slope, the only arctic tundra in the United States. The first section provides detailed information on climate, geology, landforms, and ecology. The second provides a guide to the identification and natural history of the common animals and plants and a primer on the human prehistory of the region from the Pleistocene through the mid-twentieth century. The appendix provides the framework for a tour of the natural history features along the Dalton Highway, a road connecting the crest of the Brooks Range with Prudhoe Bay and the Arctic Ocean, and includes mile markers where travelers may safely pull off to view geologic formations, plants, birds, mammals, and fish. Featuring hundreds of illustrations that support the clear, authoritative text, Land of Extremes reveals the arctic tundra as an ecosystem teeming with... Read more

A Caribbean Forest Tapestry by Nicholas Brokaw, Todd Crowl, Ariel Lugo, William McDowell, Frederick Scatena, Robert Waide, Michael Willig
Hardback, $69.95

Global change threatens ecosystems worldwide, and tropical systems with their high diversity and rapid development are of special concern. We can mitigate the impacts of change if we understand how tropical ecosystems respond to disturbance. For tropical forests and streams in Puerto Rico this book describes the impacts of, and recovery from, hurricanes, landslides, floods, droughts, and human disturbances in the Luquillo Mountains of Puerto Rico. These ecosystems recover quickly after natural disturbances, having been shaped over thousands of years by such events. Human disturbance, however, has longer-lasting impacts. Chapters are by authors with many years of experience in Puerto Rico and other tropical areas and cover the history of research in these mountains, a... Read more

Standard Soil Methods For Long-Term Ecological Research by G. Philip Robertson, David C. Coleman, Caroline S. Bledsoe, Phillip Sollins
Hardback, $112

Standardized methods and measurements are crucial for ecological research, particularly in long-term ecological studies where the projects are by nature collaborative and where it can be difficult to distinguish signs of environmental change from the effects of differing methodologies.

This second volume in the Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) Network Series addresses these issues directly by providing a comprehensive standardized set of protocols for measuring soil properties.

The goal of the volume is to facilitate cross-site synthesis and evaluation of ecosystem processes. Chapters cover methods for studying physical and chemical properties of soils, soil biological properties, and soil organisms, and they include work from many... Read more

Agrarian Landscapes in Transition by Charles L. Redman, David R. Foster
Hardback, $45

Agrarian Landscapes in Transition researches human interaction with the earth. With hundreds of acres of agricultural land going out of production every day, the introduction, spread, and abandonment of agriculture represents the most pervasive alteration of the Earth's environment for several thousand years. What happens when humans impose their spatial and temporal signatures on ecological regimes, and how does this manipulation affect the earth and nature's desire for equilibrium?

Studies were conducted at six Long Term Ecological Research sites within the US, including New England, the Appalachian Mountains, Colorado, Michigan, Kansas, and Arizona. While each site has its own unique agricultural history, patterns emerge that help make sense of how our actions have affected the earth, and how the earth pushes back.... Read more

Ecology of the Shortgrass Steppe by William Lauenroth, I. C. Burke
Hardback, $69.95

Ecology of the Shortgrass Steppe: A Long-Term Perspective summarizes and synthesizes more than sixty years of research that has been conducted throughout the shortgrass region in North America. The shortgrass steppe was an important focus of the International Biological Program's Grassland Biome project, which ran from the late 1960s until the mid-1970s. The work conducted by the Grassland Biome project was preceded by almost forty years of research by U.S. Department of Agriculture researchers-primarily from the Agricultural Research Service-and was followed by the Shortgrass Steppe Long-Term Ecological Research project. This volume is an enormously rich source of data and insight into the structure and function of a semiarid grassland.

Ecosystem Dynamics in a Polar Desert by C. Priscu
Hardback, $70

The McMurdo Dry Valleys of southern Victoria Land comprise the largest ice‐free expanse (about 4000 km2) on the Antarctic continent. Research in this region began during British expeditions of the early 1900s and has yielded much information on specific physical, chemical and biological features of the area. Only recently have scientists begun to view the region as an integrated system which includes dynamic interactions among biotic and abiotic components of the environment.

The McMurdo Dry Valleys represents the coldest and driest desert on this planet. Photoautotrophic and heterotrophic microorganisms that are intimately linked with the presence of liquid water and nutrients dominate the biological assemblages. Owing to the low average temperature (−20° C) in the region, liquid water is a rare commodity that often exists for a short period only... Read more

Forests in Time by David R. Foster, John D. Aber
Paperback, $37

This seminal book, based on innovative research at Harvard Forest, describes the dramatic natural and human-induced changes in the land and environment of New England over the past 1,000 years.

Selected as an Outstanding Academic Title for 2005 by Choice Magazine

Foundations for Ecological Research West of the Antarctic Peninsula by Robin M. Ross, Eileen Elizabeth Hofmann, Langdon Quetin
Hardback, $80

The Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) Program was established in 1981 by the United States National Science Foundation in recognition of the need to study ecological processes over time spans longer than those of most research grants. The LTER Network now consists of 18 sites that span a variety of ecosystem types in the continental United States, Alaska, Puerto Rico, and Antarctica. The addition of the Palmer LTER at Palmer Station, Antarctica in October 1990 extended the geographical and ecological range of the LTER Network and provided the opportunity to link physical and ecological processes in the northern and southern hemispheres.

One criterion for establishment of a LTER site is the existence of historical data and observations that can... Read more

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