Poster: Kelp Forests as Sentinels of Ecosystem Change

Kelp forests as sentinels of ecosystem change? 2014-2015 heatwaves offer a test.

Dan Reed, Libe Washburn, Andrew Rassweiler, Robert Miller, Tom Bell and Shannon Harrer

Santa Barbara Coastal LTER, Marine Science Institute, University of California Santa Barbara

Poster presented at NSF-LTER Symposium, March 21, 2017

Presentation: Climate Resilient Coasts (McGlathery)

Coastal habitats are the first line of defense against sea-level rise and storms. At the same time, they are vulnerable to change, and can be pushed past tipping points and lost. A long-term, landscape-scale experiment with seagrass at Virginia Coast Reserve LTER is the first of its kind to show the role of restoration in reinstating ecosystem services, particularly ‘blue carbon’ sequestration.

Responses of soft sediment coastal ecosystems to sea level rise and coastal squeeze in the LTER Network

Goals:

Coastal ecosystems are highly valued as key economic and cultural assets for society. They provide a wealth of ecosystem functions including storm protection, nutrient cycling, carbon sequestration, water filtration, detrital processing, fisheries, food web support, biodiversity and wildlife habitat. Rapidly growing populations and expanding development are intensifying pressures on these valuable ecosystems.

Regulation of Organic Matter Preservation in Soils and Sediments

The workshop, “Scoop on Dirt” was held to compare soil organic matter (SOM) data and elicit a dialogue among estuarine wetland scientists from the eastern U.S., Gulf and Pacific coasts. The workshop, organized by Chris Craft, was held in conjunction with the Estuarine Research Federation meeting. Approximately 50 participants attended, including a core group of scientists (Jim Morris-PIE, Linda Blum, Bob Christian, Iris Anderson-VCR, Chris Craft-GCE, Randy Chambers-FCE) from coastal NSF LTER sites.