Studies in the “science of team science” are now identifying specific practices that encourage more effective and productive collaborative teams. LTER synthesis working groups benefit from NCEAS’ and the LTER Network’s experience with working group dynamics, as well as the literature of team science and open science for synthesis.

Building your team

Participation in a synthesis group can be a career altering opportunity. Everyone wants a team with good chemistry, where you know people will pull their weight and respect each other’s ideas. So it can be tempting to choose only people you know personally. We urge you to reach beyond your comfort zone to engage individuals with different skills and approaches, from different backgrounds. Draw on your extended network, keep a special eye out at conferences, and build partnerships with undergraduate or minority-serving institutions.

Try to be deliberate about adding knowledge and skills to complement those already on the team. Adding another community ecologist or biogeochemist (for example) may not add as much to the team’s capabilities as a biostatistician, a modeler, or a hydrologist. 

Identifying appropriate data

It’s easy to make assumptions about what data might or should be available when you are in the throes of a good idea. By thinking carefully about what data will be needed early in the process, researchers can save themselves a lot of time and frustration down the road.

Eleven Quick Tips for Finding Research Data (Gregory et al. 2018) has a plethora of ideas for where and how to look, but the authors’ first tip is this: “think about the data you need and why you need them.” Remember to consider what kinds of data may be needed to normalize your primary data and be sure they are available.

Derived data products developed under this funding opportunity must be made publicly available, so be sure that contributors understand the requirement when they agree to participate — and remember to keep track of the sources, access dates, and any constraints associated with each data set.

Think about the data you need and why you need them.”

— Kathleen Gregory

Facilitation

The very quality that adds value to a synthesis group can also be its downfall. By including multiple perspectives on a problem, researchers increase the chances of arriving at a new solution. But it can take a surprising amount of time to identify and resolve conflicting understandings. Participants often reach a plateau (or even a valley) where they feel they are simply not comprehending one another — or the insights they are reaching are completely derivative.

Persist! That’s what’s known as the groan zone (a concept drawn from Sam Kaner’s book,  Facilitator’s Guide to Participatory Decision-Making) and it is where the real intellectual work of synthesis happens.

diagram relating number and diversity of ideas through the duration of a working group

Not all researchers are born facilitators, but it is a skill that can be learned. Kaner’s book is one good resource, as are these shorter articles and reports:

Maintaining Momentum

Working group meetings can be exciting, with in-depth discussion and  rapid progress toward shared goals, but they will be most productive if the group has maintained momentum between meetings. Everyone doesn’t need to be involved in every decision, but working group leaders should establish a mechanism for regular group interaction between meetings. The best mechanism for your group is the one they will use. Some approaches that we have seen work well are:

  • An email list. (LNO can set up a shared list with immediate or digest options.)
  • Instant messaging on Slack and a running task board on Trello. Both have free plans for small groups and the LTER Network has a branded Slack account.
  • A google website, with space for a shared calendar, uploaded documents, and group discussion. Simple to set up and maintain, this can also serve as a public presence for the group.
  • For those who are reasonably fluent in it, GitHub has great versioning for code, markdown for private/public documents, shared wikis, and assignable task lists.

Computing and analysis

NCEAS staff have deep experience in supporting and facilitating data-intensive collaborations. Shared server spaces, archived e-mail lists, wikis, Slack channels, Trello boards, and videoconferencing can all help keep collaborations moving between in-person meetings. Spend a little time as your team is assembling to discuss how your group likes to work and what tools they already know.

Using resources such as GitHub, R, Python and other scripting languages, savvy investigators can develop reproducible workflows that encourage effective documentation and allow users to quickly adapt analyses or rerun them with new or expanded data. The NCEAS/LTER computing staff is eager to help you find the technological solutions to your data and collaboration challenges. At least one member of each working group will be eligible to participate (at no cost) in week long training on Reproducible Research Techniques for Synthesis.

Additional resources are also available through the NCEAS/DataONE Learning Hub, The Environmental Data Initiative‘s resource pages, Data Carpentry,  and many other entities in the Earth and environmental sciences space.

Publication

Misunderstandings over authorship of large group products can be painful and time consuming. One of your first tasks as a working group should be to decide on a framework for determining authorship on publications. Is providing data a sufficient contribution to warrant authorship? Do all authors need to have read and commented on the manuscript? How and when should a potential author opt out?

When you do publish, please remember to acknowledge support provided through the LTER Network Office, grant DEB 1545288 and to alert the LTER Network Office, the NCEAS Communications Office, and the National Science Foundation Office of Public Affairs of your publication on acceptance.

Communicating Results

The LTER Network Office and NCEAS also provide communications training and advice to broaden the impact and social utility of the synthesis research, and leverage connections through other partnerships such as the Science for Nature and People Partnership (SNAPP), the Science Policy Exchange, and COMPASS to engage audiences such as NGOs and public agencies in using synthesis results.