Study: Forest clearcuts show sustained losses of carbon, surprising trends in water

PETERSHAM, Mass.—A new study out of the Harvard Forest, released today in the journal Global Change Biology, is the first detailed account of how carbon, water, and energy balances shift in the three years following the clearcut of a deciduous forest. The study, conducted by Clark University Professor Christopher Williams and colleagues in a 20-acre… Read more »

Harvard Forest researchers say whitebark pine tree’s future may be at risk

New research by Harvard Forest (HFR) LTER scientists suggest that widespread death of the whiteback pine tree from beetle infestations and tree disease outbreaks may be affecting seed production and hence the future of the tree–a mountain tree important to wildlife and water resources in the western United States and Canada. In a paper published… Read more »

Where Does Charcoal, or Black Carbon, in Soils Go?

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Where Does Charcoal, or Black Carbon, in Soils Go? Scientists find surprising new answers in wetlands such as the Everglades April 18, 2013 — Scientists have uncovered one of nature’s long-kept secrets–the true fate of charcoal in the world’s soils. The ability to determine the fate of charcoal is critical to knowledge… Read more »

KBS researchers see marginal lands as prime fuel source for alternative energy

Biofuel experts identify a way to meet 25 percent of Congress’ 2022 cellulosic energy production goals Marginal lands unsuited for food crops can serve as prime real estate for meeting the nation’s alternative energy production goals. In the current issue of the journal Nature, a team of researchers working at the MSU’s Kellogg Biological Station… Read more »

Long-term research reveals how climate change is playing out in real ecosystems

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Media Contact: Lori Quillen (quillenl@caryinstitute.org), (845) 677-7600 x121 DECEMBER 1, 2012 NORTH WOODSTOCK, N.H.—Around the world, the effects of global climate change are increasingly evident and difficult to ignore. However, evaluations of the local effects of climate change are often confounded by natural and human induced factors that overshadow the effects of… Read more »

Plum Island study says nutrients likely causing salt marsh loss

Scientists studying salt marshes at the Plum Island Ecosystem (PIE) Long Term Ecological Research site have long wondered why the marshes were disintegrating and dying at a faster rate than normal. Writing in the journal Nature this week the scientists, led by Linda Deegan of PIE and the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) in Woods Hole,… Read more »

In blown down forests, a story of survival

Contact: Clarisse Hart, Harvard Forest Outreach Manager Telephone: (978) 756-6157 (9a to 5p) Email: hart3@fas.harvard.edu October 16, 2012 PETERSHAM, MASSACHUSETTS—In newscasts following intense wind and ice storms, damaged trees stand out: snapped limbs, uprooted trunks, sometimes entire forests blown nearly flat. In the storm’s wake, landowners, municipalities, and state agencies are faced with important financial… Read more »

Native plants in urban yards offer refuge to local birds

A study by scientists at the Central Arizona-Phoenix (CAP) Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) site found that residential yards in urban areas with native vegetation support local bird species better than those with traditional grass lawns, essentially providing “mini refuges.” The study, published in the online journal PLoS ONE, looked at residential landscapes in Phoenix,… Read more »